Sunday, June 13, 2010

Sunday Morning Poetry

i see
those girls
your age
lurking around the local tim hortons
and my heart feels sick
as i listen to them curse jagged profanity
and cringe at their harsh giggles
and poorly done makeup....
and i think of you.
{my soft and sweet, my fuzzy peach cheeked...}
i hate to think of you
as hard
or jaded...
brittle
and mean.

those girls that look as tough as nails
but you know would shatter like glass
make my heart sink.

and i grieve for your fuzzy peach cheeks
as i compliment
your thick new mascara
that obscures your soft blue eyes

and you silently love me behind your teenage disguise.
~ by GK Girl



I love how blogs bring people together, don't you? GK Girl is a friend of mine with a lovely blog. This poem really spoke to my mother's heart. For more of her poetry, visit her here at Geek Inc.

33 comments:

Mrs. E said...

Any mother of a daughter can identify! Wonderful!

Teri and the cats of Furrydance said...

I have not been a mother, but have felt this, as an aunt, many times...very heartfelt poem.

WhiteStone said...

Yes. Me, too. I just pray that some of those girls are soft inside and just not yet touched by God's good grace of his calling their heart. I sorrow that they do not yet see.

lakeviewer said...

Wow, that poem says it all, a mother's wish and fear, her hope to hold on to innocence a bit longer. Thanks for sharing it.

kath said...

I remember. The hardness belies a fear of not fitting in, not knowing who you are. I wouldn't go back to those days for love nor money but I know they shaped me into the woman I am so they are a necessary evil.
xo

Char said...

if only a lot of mother's can really understand this ... and daughters too.

it's always the hard lessons.

sanjeet said...

.very heartfelt poem.
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krissilugbill said...

your blog is so lovely! thank you for sharing the poetry, it was so nice to get a little piece of beauty this morning :)

S. Etole said...

The heart for our young girls ... powerful poem.

Delena said...

For years I worked in a downtown office and when I took the bus home I always found the young girls swore why more than the boys the same age. It was always the case. Sad....

Suvarna said...

beautiful piece, goes right to the heart of the matter and a mother. "those girls that look as tough as nails but you know would shatter like glass" very insightful.
I must go check out her blog, thanks
xo

willow said...

The process of daughters coming to age is so delicate and fearful.

Kamana said...

hi relyn, i am looking at the possibility of arranging some visits to US elementary schools, and was wondering if you could help. could you please email me - brownbutterfly@live.co.uk.

Marion Williams-Bennett said...

OH, how do we survive this! Our little girls when they move into this part of life.

What a beautiful poem, thank you for sharing her work with us!

Susan Tuttle said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Susan Tuttle said...

oh -- this gets me right in the heart -- those are the toughest years. your daughter is so very lucky to have a mamma that truly gets the social psychology of these years. I bet you are a fantastic, empathetic listener.

I loved receiving your comment (as always) -- they are always so filled with thought, kindness and love.

Thank you:)

xo

Cinner said...

It would be nice if all could understand this at the same time. take care. very touching.

Erin Wallace said...

This kills me - I have a 16 going on 17 year old and I've been there and done that. Thankfully she came out the other side relatively unscathed.

Thanks for your nice comments on my photos! You are so nice, Relyn.

xo Erin

Tracy said...

Oh, this is a heavy one, Relyn, beautiful, but heavy. I wouldn't go back to my teen years eithr. So happy in my 30's. I have a young niece on the cusp of teenagedom, and wonder how these years will go for her. Interesting to see... Happy Day, Relyn ((HUGS))

HKatz said...

That last line is especially beautiful. And I liked the words chosen for "curse jagged profanity" - cutting and broken, like all the fragile sharp glass imagery in the poem.

meandering pearl said...

0h that every child had someone to grieve for them!!! its such a special job we have, of nurturing!!! & how well you do it Relyn, its something i admire about your life & blogposts so!!! such special thoughts

The Simply Luxurious Life said...

Love this poem. It speaks so many truths that youth fail to recognize. Well written. You have a wonderful way with poetry.
Thank you so much for stopping by. Have a beautiful week. =)

ELK said...

it is straight to a mothers heart here ..

Christina said...

this is breathtaking.
and i adore GK Girl, just adore her.

sending love to you~
xo

Derrick said...

Hi Relyn,

Boys can smoke and curse and try to be macho but girls also have fashion and makeup and that can add a whole new dimension!

Joanne said...

Beautiful verse here. I've found that with each passing year in my chldren's lives, layers are added that enrich our relationship. We're always growing, together.

CrowNology said...

Hi Relyn,
Thanks for the comments today! I did create that Paris piece in the side bar...It was fun to do...I am trying to keep reminding myself of the things I want later so I don't spend all my money on the things I want in the now! :)
I love this poem. Thinking of having (hopefully) a daughter in the next couple of years and this was touching...
Have a great Week!
xo
Andrea

Hindsfeet said...

heartbreaking.....

Jeanne said...

I love this
Big hugs

Ragamuffin Gal said...

Painfully haunting! Picture is perfect for this post. You are such a master at presentation. I so love you dear.

SE'LAH... said...

love this!

you always have such wonderful poetry to share with us. i so enjoy it.
one love.

Patti said...

Oh this poem made me sad (not that I needed any help in THAT department)...but I loved it anyway- hope that makes sense!

Jaime said...

Oh these words are so true.
The harder someone looks on the outside, the more breakable they are on the inside.
You couldn't pay me to be a teenager again.

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